YouTube Category

YouTube and Internet Television

yahoo-logoYouTube is one of the tentpoles of the Web at this point in time, being a household name and one of the most-visited sites on the Internet. And yet Yahoo is reportedly planning to compete with YouTube by launching its own online video service. The fools.

YouTube Competition

YouTube is a giant amongst giants. It’s owned by Google, racks up 1 billion visitors every month who collectively watch 6 billion hours of video every month, and pushes out 100 hours of new content every minute.

That’s one hell of an achievement, and it makes YouTube a seemingly impossible scalp to take. It is for this reason that YouTube has hardly any competition.

There are lots of other video sites on the Web — Vimeo, Dailymotion, and Metacafe to name just three — but none that can compete in terms of content or eyeballs. Only a foolish company would even contemplate the idea of trying to beat YouTube at its own game…

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court-gavelGoogle and Viacom have finally resolved the long-running lawsuit over videos uploaded to YouTube almost a decade ago. The terms of the out-of-court settlement aren’t being disclosed but we’re just pleased this anachronistic fight is over. At last.

The Beginning

In 2005, when YouTube was still a fledgling service with a Wild West mentality, people were uploading all sorts of content to the site with little regard for legality. Copyrighted clips belonging to Viacom made it onto YouTube, and so began the long and tortuous story of Google Vs. Viacom.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, Google, Legal, DRM, Piracy & IP, News, Video on Demand, YouTube by Dave Parrack on February 27, 2014

u.s.-flag-burningAn appeals court has ordered Google to remove a controversial short film from YouTube after an actress who appeared in Innocence Of Muslims filed a copyright claim. The decision seems to go against existing thinking on copyright laws.

Innocence Of Muslims

In 2012, a 14-minute video titled Innocence Of Muslims was uploaded to YouTube. The video, which is extremely offensive to Islam, caused controversy around the world, and especially across the Middle-East.

It was used to justify demonstrations and protests, some of which turned violent. These protests claimed the lives of at least 50 people, with many more being injured. The death toll included four American diplomats, who were killed in an attack on the consulate in Benghazi.

At this point the U.S. Government asked Google to act, but the company refused to remove the video from YouTube because it complied with its posting guidelines. Viewing was, however, restricted in both Egypt and Libya.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, Google, Legal, DRM, Piracy & IP, News, Video on Demand, YouTube by Dave Parrack on December 20, 2013

youtube-copyright-errorYouTube’s recent crackdown on Let’s Play videos, with an aggressive new Content ID update, has left a bad taste in the mouths of everyone involved. Except the companies making money from videos they really had no business making money from, of course.

Content ID Crackdown

YouTube recently embarked on a Content ID crackdown designed to clean up videos potentially infringing on copyrights. Particularly hard hit by this were gamers who upload Let’s Play videos, which feature someone playing a video game and commentating over the top.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, Legal, DRM, Piracy & IP, News, Video on Demand, YouTube by Dave Parrack on November 26, 2013

YouTube 3D LogoGoogle has finally addressed the issues affecting the new YouTube comments system, controversially rolled out earlier this month.

Unfortunately, while small changes are being made to plaster over the cracks, the elephant in the room that is Google+ is going nowhere. In fact, Google refuses to even address the part its social networking integration has played in the mess.

Google Admits Problem

In the weeks since the new YouTube comments system was pushed out to an unsuspecting public, things haven’t gone well. But Google has remained silent on the issues, both big and small, preferring instead to make small changes behind the scenes.

Now, finally, Google has admitted there are problems inherent in the new Google+-powered system, though it won’t admit Google+ is at fault for any of them.

In a post on the YouTube Creator Blog, “the YouTube comments team” admits the new system “introduced new opportunities for abuse.” These include the allowing of ASCII art and links, and the promotion of popular comments.

These are, according to YouTube, all being fixed, while threaded conversations, formatted comments, the moderation of old comments, and bulk moderation for new comments are being rolled out now or in the future.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, Google, News, Video on Demand, YouTube by Dave Parrack on November 8, 2013

new-youtube-logoGoogle has rolled out the new YouTube comments system, which is designed to stop the absurd levels of spam and trolling which have plagued the site in recent years. Unfortunately the new system requires Google+ integration, and this hasn’t gone down well with a significant section of the YouTube community.

YouTube Comments

The new YouTube comments system requires users to have an active Google+ account. This removes some, though not all, of the anonymity that allowed people to make atrocious comments under videos they disliked.

This change means relevant comments are listed first, meaningful conversations are much more likely to take place, conversations can be made public or private, and channel owners have more power to moderate comments.

Of course there’s a desire from Google to force us all to start using Google+, but like it or not that does appear to have been the best solution to the problematic comments system that has made YouTube a cesspit of hatred.

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New-YouTube-LogoGoogle is set to launch a YouTube music streaming service before the end of 2013, at least if current persistent rumors are to be believed. This service will work the same way as Spotify, with a hefty catalog of music available for users to play.

Music On YouTube

Music has been a key part of YouTube since the site’s inception in 2006. In those early, heady days it was a result of people illicitly uploading music videos without a care for the copyright laws being flouted, but it’s now (mostly) all above board thanks to a stringent copyright ID system.

Music videos are often the most-viewed pieces of content on the platform, with Gangnam Style being an obvious example. This eventually led to the number of YouTube views a video generates counting towards its placing on the Billboard charts.

It’s no wonder then that Google is keen to turn this popular element of YouTube into a money-making machine.

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