Broadband Video Companies Category

Companies that have an interest in Web Television, video and TV via the Internet (IPTV)

new-youtube-logoYouTube would be nothing without content, and original content, no less. And the people who create that original content need as many tools at their disposal as possible. YouTube has delivered a new set of features to content creators that should help make their jobs easier than ever before.

Content Is King

The old adage that content is king has never been truer than for YouTube at this very moment. What started out as a site where short, crappy clips ruled supreme, has evolved into a site packed full of interesting and original content.

The production values are through the roof, and certain individuals are gaining fame and fortune purely as a result of running popular YouTube channels. YouTube understands this need to foster the talent, hence its extra efforts to help make the lives of content creators easier than ever before.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, News, Video Distribution, Video on Demand by Dave Parrack on May 26, 2014

netflix-logo-squareNetflix is officially expanding into mainland Europe, announcing its intentions to launch in six more countries by the end of 2014.

In doing so, it faces several new challenges in France, Germany, Austria, and others. Strong competition and localization issues being amongst the issues facing Netflix in these new countries.

Netflix Expansion

There have been strong hints of a Netflix invasion of mainland Europe for some time, but the company has now made it official by announcing its intention to launch streaming services in France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium, and Luxembourg.

The expansion will, all being well, happen before the end of 2014, but no launch date has been specified. This new expansion follows on from the American company hitting the UK and Ireland in January 2012, followed by Sweden, Denmark, Norway, and Finland in October 2012, and the Netherlands in 2013.

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xbox-originals-logoMicrosoft has long held ambitious plans to turn its games console into a media hub delivering masses of content of all kinds into people’s living rooms. With Xbox Originals, it may be on its way to realizing this dream. Unfortunately, while the initiative has a lot of promise, the details leave a lot of room for disappointment.

Xbox Originals

Microsoft has announced the initial lineup for Xbox Originals, its first foray into original programming. Committed projects include a Halo TV show, Every Street United, an unscripted show featuring famous soccer players, and Humans, a show about robotic servants.

There are further projects in development that may or may not make it past the pilot stage. These include Deadlands, based on a pen-and-paper RPG, Gun Machine, a detective thriller based on the novel by Warren Ellis, and Winterworld, based on Chuck Dixon and Jorge Zaffino’s series of graphic novels.

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yahoo-logoYouTube is one of the tentpoles of the Web at this point in time, being a household name and one of the most-visited sites on the Internet. And yet Yahoo is reportedly planning to compete with YouTube by launching its own online video service. The fools.

YouTube Competition

YouTube is a giant amongst giants. It’s owned by Google, racks up 1 billion visitors every month who collectively watch 6 billion hours of video every month, and pushes out 100 hours of new content every minute.

That’s one hell of an achievement, and it makes YouTube a seemingly impossible scalp to take. It is for this reason that YouTube has hardly any competition.

There are lots of other video sites on the Web — Vimeo, Dailymotion, and Metacafe to name just three — but none that can compete in terms of content or eyeballs. Only a foolish company would even contemplate the idea of trying to beat YouTube at its own game…

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court-gavelGoogle and Viacom have finally resolved the long-running lawsuit over videos uploaded to YouTube almost a decade ago. The terms of the out-of-court settlement aren’t being disclosed but we’re just pleased this anachronistic fight is over. At last.

The Beginning

In 2005, when YouTube was still a fledgling service with a Wild West mentality, people were uploading all sorts of content to the site with little regard for legality. Copyrighted clips belonging to Viacom made it onto YouTube, and so began the long and tortuous story of Google Vs. Viacom.

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BBC iPlayer LogoThe BBC has unveiled the new iPlayer, and its free catch-up television service has undergone several big changes. The biggest being an HTML5-powered responsive design driving the whole effort.

The New iPlayer

The BBC has unveiled a newly-redesigned iPlayer, one that’s followed the trend set by other forward-thinking websites by featuring a responsive design that adapts in size and layout depending on the device on which it’s being viewed.

The BBC iPlayer hasn’t been changed this considerably since it debuted seven years ago. While unveiling the new look, BBC director general Tony Hall described the iPlayer as the new “front door” of the BBC in terms of content.

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Posted in: Broadband Video Companies, Google, Legal, DRM, Piracy & IP, News, Video on Demand, YouTube by Dave Parrack on February 27, 2014

u.s.-flag-burningAn appeals court has ordered Google to remove a controversial short film from YouTube after an actress who appeared in Innocence Of Muslims filed a copyright claim. The decision seems to go against existing thinking on copyright laws.

Innocence Of Muslims

In 2012, a 14-minute video titled Innocence Of Muslims was uploaded to YouTube. The video, which is extremely offensive to Islam, caused controversy around the world, and especially across the Middle-East.

It was used to justify demonstrations and protests, some of which turned violent. These protests claimed the lives of at least 50 people, with many more being injured. The death toll included four American diplomats, who were killed in an attack on the consulate in Benghazi.

At this point the U.S. Government asked Google to act, but the company refused to remove the video from YouTube because it complied with its posting guidelines. Viewing was, however, restricted in both Egypt and Libya.

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